The term “cooperation agreement” has also been referred to as a consultation agreement, a collaborative pharmacy practice agreement, a physician-pharmacist agreement, a permanent order or a permanent protocol, and a physician delegation. [6] A Collaborative Practice Agreement is a legal document in the United States that establishes a formal relationship between pharmacists (often clinical pharmacy specialists) and cooperating physicians, in order to create a legal and ethical basis for pharmacists involved in collaborative therapy management. [7] [4] CPAs are a lobbying priority for professional pharmaceutical organizations. In January 2012, the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) brought together a consortium of pharmacy, medical and care professionals from 12 countries to discuss the integration of CPAs into daily clinical practice. [53] The consortium published a white paper entitled “Consortium Recommendations for Advancing Pharmacists” Patients Care Services and Collaborative Practice Agreements and summarized their recommendations. [18] Advanced pharmacy services under a CPA are described as collaborative management of drug therapy (CDTM). [a] While traditional practice for pharmacists provides that the legal authority recognizes drug-related problems (DOP) and proposes solutions for PDs to prescription persons (e.g. B physicians), pharmacists who offer CDTMs solve PDs directly when they recognize them. This may include prescribing drugs to select and initiate drugs to treat a patient`s diagnosed illnesses (as described in the CPA), stopping the use of prescription or over-the-counter drugs, and modifying a patient`s drug treatment (for example. B change in strength, frequency, frequency of administration or duration of therapy), evaluation of a patient`s response to drug treatment (including drug treatment). , such as.B.

a basic metabolic panel) and the continuation of drug therapy (with a new prescription). [7] According to health researcher Karen E. Koch, the first step in “collaborative management of drug therapy” can be attributed to William A. Zellmers in 1995 in the American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy. [4] Zellmer argues for the use of the term “collaborative management of drug therapy” instead of “prescription,” and argues that this will make laws that expand the authority of pharmacists tastier for legislators (and physician representatives).