North America, with the exception of Cuba and Haiti (which has been involved in economic integration with Caricom since 2002) [12][13] is about to establish a sub-continental free trade area. Among the agreements in the area of the Americas are here: the FTAA missed the 2005 deadline, which followed the deadlock in meaningful negotiations at the 2005 World Trade Organization Ministerial Conference. [3] In the following years, some governments, particularly the United States, that did not want to lose a chance for hemispheric trade expansion, moved towards a series of bilateral trade agreements. However, the Heads of State and Government planned to continue discussions at the 6th US Summit in Cartagen, Colombia, in 2012, although these discussions did not take place. [4] [5] In the last round of negotiations, trade ministers from 34 countries met in Miami, Florida, USA in November 2003 to discuss the proposal. Venezuelan President Hugo Chávez, who called it an “annexation plan” and a “tool of imperialism” for the exploitation of Latin America, has been a resounding critic of the SAA. [7] As a counter-proposal to this initiative, Chávez supported the Bolivarian Alliance for the United States (ALBA), which highlights the energy and infrastructure agreements, which will be gradually extended to other areas in order to integrate the full economic, political and military integration of member states. [7] Evo Morales, Bolivian, called the U.S.-backed U.S. Free Trade Area “an agreement to legalize the colonization of America.” [8] In previous negotiations, the United States had insisted that a single comprehensive agreement be concluded to reduce trade barriers to goods while strengthening intellectual property protection. Specific intellectual property protection measures could include copyright protection measures in the style of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, similar to the free trade agreement between the United States and Australia. Additional protection would likely have limited the import or cross-import of drugs, similar to the proposed agreement between the United States and Canada. . .

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